Monday, September 26, 2016

http://www.renaissancesociety.org/exhibitions/324/the-sixth-day-a-survey-of-recent-developments-in-figurative-sculpture/

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Shou Sugi Ban

Show Sugi Ban process partially described here
and here 

Tensegrity Structures

Tensegrity: The characteristic property of a stable three-dimensional structure consisting of members under tension that are contiguous and members under compression that are not.

Do a google search for "tensegrity sculpture" or "tensegrity furniture".

View Nasa Super Ball Bot (pictured above) here 





Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Neukom Vivarium

Mark Dion's Neukom Vivarium. Here is the wiki link and also is the video link.

Neukom Vivarium

Video here

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Large Scale Scrap Wood Sculptures: Thomas Dambo


Dambo is an artist who makes insane, large scale wood sculptures out of scrap wood.

http://www.boredpanda.com/giant-scrap-wood-sculptures-thomas-dambo/

Thursday, September 8, 2016

German Forest Ranger Finds That Trees Have Social Networks, Too


HÜMMEL, Germany — IN the deep stillness of a forest in winter, the sound of footsteps on a carpet of leaves died away. Peter Wohlleben had found what he was looking for: a pair of towering beeches. “These trees are friends,” he said, craning his neck to look at the leafless crowns, black against a gray sky. “You see how the thick branches point away from each other? That’s so they don’t block their buddy’s light.”   
continue reading here

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Ursula von Rydingsvard in "Ecology" Art21



Ursula von Rydingsvard in "Ecology" Art21 video here

Ursula von Rydingsvard was born in Deensen, Germany, in 1942. She received a BA and an MA from the University of Miami, Coral Gables (1965), an MFA from Columbia University (1975), and an honorary doctorate from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore (1991). Von Rydingsvard’s massive sculptures reveal the trace of the human hand and resemble wooden bowls, tools, and walls that seem to echo the artist’s family heritage in pre-industrial Poland before World War II. The artist spent her childhood in Nazi slave-labor and postwar refugee camps, and her earliest recollections—of displacement and subsistence through humble means—infuse her work with emotional potency. Von Rydingsvard builds towering cedar structures, creating an intricate network of individual beams, shaped by sharp and lyrical cuts and glued together to form sensuous, puzzle-like surfaces. While abstract at its core, Von Rydingsvard’s work takes visual cues from the landscape, the human body, and utilitarian objects—such as the artist’s collection of household vessels—and demonstrates an interest in the point where the man-made meets nature. Von Rydingsvard has received many awards, including a Joan Mitchell Award (1997); an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1994); fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation (1983) and the National Endowment for the Arts (1979, 1986); and exhibition prizes from the International Association of Art Critics (1992, 2000). Major exhibitions include Madison Square Park, New York (2006); Neuberger Museum, Purchase College, State University of New York (2002); and Storm King Art Center (1992). Von Rydingsvard lives and works in New York.

Martin Puryear Art21

Martin Puryear Art 21 video here

Martin Puryear was born in Washington, DC, in 1941. In his youth, he studied crafts and learned how to build guitars, furniture, and canoes through practical training and instruction. After earning his BA from Catholic University in Washington DC, Puryear joined the Peace Corps in Sierra Leone, and later attended the Swedish Royal Academy of Art. He received an MFA in sculpture from Yale University in 1971. Puryear’s objects and public installations—in wood, stone, tar, wire, and various metals—are a marriage of minimalist logic with traditional ways of making. Puryear’s evocative, dreamlike explorations in abstract forms retain vestigial elements of utility from everyday objects found in the world. In "Ladder for Booker T. Washington," Puryear built a spindly, meandering ladder out of jointed ash wood. More than thirty-five-feet tall, the ladder narrows toward the top, creating a distorted sense of perspective that evokes an unattainable or illusionary goal. In the massive stone piece, "Untitled," Puryear enlisted a local stonemason to help him construct a building-like structure on a ranch in northern California. On one side of the work is an eighteen-foot-high wall—on the other side, an inexplicable stone bulge. A favorite form that occurs in Puryear’s work, the thick-looking stone bulge is surprisingly hollow, coloring the otherwise sturdy shape with qualities of uncertainty, emptiness, and loss. Martin Puryear represented the United States at the Bienal de São Paulo in 1989, where his exhibition won the Grand Prize. Puryear is the recipient of numerous awards, including a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Award, a Louis Comfort Tiffany Grant, and the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture. Puryear was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1992 and received an honorary doctorate from Yale University in 1994. Martin Puryear lives and works in the Hudson Valley region of New York.

Theaster Gates on 'Brilliant Ideas'



Theater Gates video here

Mika Tajima Versus the Cubicle | "New York Close Up" | Art21



Mika Tajima video here

How does design shape society? In this film, artist Mika Tajima traces the legacy of the influential Action Office furniture line—developed by Herman Miller—and how it serves as the inspiration for her own work. Introduced in 1964 and still in production today, the Action Office is a modular and customizable system of semi-enclosed cubicles. Intended to spur efficiency and productivity in the workplace, Tajima views the widespread adoption of the cubicle in the 1970s and 80s as profoundly dehumanizing, with each worker isolated in a sea of confined spaces. For her work, Tajima acquires and modifies an original set of Action Office wall panels, configuring them into non-functional, sculptural arrangements. Tajima connects the unintended consequences of Herman Miller's modernist aesthetic, with its insistence on shaping human behavior, to contemporary problems in the Twenty-first Century.

Watch the related film "Mika Tajima Wants to Hire Contortionists."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QUGKP...

Mika Tajima (b. 1975, Los Angeles, California, USA) lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

CREDITS | "New York Close Up" Created & Produced by: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Editor: Joaquin Perez & Mary Ann Toman. Cinematography: Jarred Alterman & Andrew David Watson. Key Grip: John Marton. Sound: Nicholas Lindner & Nick Ravich. Associate Producer: Ian Forster. Production Assistant: Paulina V. Ahlstrom, Don Edler & Maren Miller. Design & Graphics: Crux Studio & Open. Artwork: Mika Tajima. Archival Material: Herman Miller. Thanks: Linda Baron, Ron Reeves, & Tim Saltarelli. An Art21 Workshop Production. © Art21, Inc. 2011. All rights reserved.

"New York Close Up" is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional support provided by The 1896 Studios & Stages.